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Chiropractic Does Affect Brain Function

Posted by on July 8, 2016

We do know that spinal function does affect brain function. A recent study, published in the Journal of Neural Plasticity provides solid evidence that adjusting the spine changes brain function. This is the fourth time that the effect of adjusting the spine has on the brain has been studied.

This study indicates that adjustments impact the function of the prefrontal cortex. The significance of this finding is that the prefrontal cortex is the ‘conductor’ in the brain, controlling many functions within the body.

Such a finding can explain many of the previous findings of Chiropractic’s effects such as improvements in sensorimotor function relevant to falls-prevention; better joint-position sense in both the upper limb and the lower limb; improved muscle strength in lower limb muscles; better pelvic floor control; and better ability to carry out mental rotation of objects.

If, as this research suggests, adjusting improves prefrontal cortex activity, a part of the brain that is responsible for just so much higher level function, then what does this mean in terms of chiropractic’s impact on things like behaviour, decision making, memory and attention, intelligence, processing of pain and emotional responses, and more.

This study showed that Chiropractic care doesn’t just alter brain function a little, it increases the prefrontal cortex activity by 20%! This means every time you receive a Chiropractic adjustment, the part of the brain that is responsible for ‘higher level functions’ is being stimulated, increasing body awareness and allowing your body to function at a much higher level.

1. Lelic et al. “Manipulation of dysfunctional spinal joints affects sensorimotor integration in the pre-frontal cortex: A brain source localization study,” Neural Plasticity, Volume 2016. Original Report